so.many.lambs! march 2019

Remember those two remaining ewes that were keeping their legs crossed? Well, we waited. And waited. And waited. We had booked a weekend away and spent a lot of time begging those last two girls to drop their babies before our much anticipated two nights away in glamorous Sussex. So naturally, at 11.10am on the Friday morning the first one started giving birth. With a bit of help from Jon a neat, pretty little ewe lamb was born to one of my two favourite girls. Result! Now, with the car packed and ready to go, the hotel room ready and waiting for us, we were ready to.....oh no. The FINAL ewe chose 4pm to start to drop a lamb in the front field and immediately run away from it in utter horror. She had to be physically carried inside to convince her that (in close quarters) her baby was in fact worth bothering with. Mum and son were happy and feeding when we left.

The next morning we had a text from our wonderful farmsitter (who is also, fortunately, a former veterinary nurse), a little confused about the numbers of lambs meant to be in each pen. She had every right to be- the last lamb now had a strapping little brother! It turned out that the ewe that we thought had finished really wasn't. After we had left she had quietly got on with having another. Good girl!So the final total is eight lambs- three ewes and five rams. They all seem healthy and bright- we've been amazed at how quickly the Welsh Badger lambs are up, on their feet and feeding. In their natural habitat of Wales I suppose they have to be pretty resilient as they mostly lamb outside on the hills. 

lambs at last!- march 2019

image122

After a lambless first year  at Farrantshayes we are now officially the proud owners of no less than five Welsh Badger Faced lambs- and we aren't even finished yet! Two of the girls are still keeping their legs crossed- probably because of this awful windy weather we have been having. We had a lovely open morning for friends with young children at the farm last Saturday with cake, squash and the opportunity to stroke a lamb. Some of our visitors were a bit nervous at first but the lambs had no such problems- they are confident little things!

a few new faces- january 2019

image123

We are so in love with our Mangalitsa pigs that we have decided to expand into breeding purebred BPA registered stock. This is the perfect excuse for a building project for Jon and five new custom designed pigpens have gone into one of the sheds at the top of the farm so that we can bring the herd in from the worst of the weather. Little Bree and Jamie came on the 20th January; Jamie is our future breeding boar and one of the last two deep red boars in the UK. 

Mangalitsa sows
pigs

Molly and Doris arrived on the 26th January and are really tame already. They have very beautiful fringed ears! We are hoping to see their first purebred pedigree litters this Summer; our boar Pumba is certainly very taken with them! Recently we managed to trace Marmalade's breeding back through his eartag and after a lot of detective work (hue vote of thanks to Lisa Hodgson, the breed rep) we have now managed to register him with the British Pig Association. With fewer than 30 Manglitsa boars in the UK, this is a wonderful thing not just for us, but for the breed in general. What a great start to the year! 

New homes for Christmas!- december 2018

image124

This last weekend has seen some of our lovely young pigs and steers go to their new homes.  Red's latest litter of Mangalitsa weaners were collected by two sets of excited new owners this morning. Two little red boars went off to Keith, Sophie and their family in Axminster and two blonde gilts and their blonde brother are travelling down to North Cornwall to live with Rob. Tomorrow we are delivering Kev and Kingdom to their new with David and Aly (who run the wonderful https://www.hotsmoked.co.uk/ )

 near Tiverton, where they will be spoiled 'only cows'. It gives me such a nice warm glow to see our carefully raised young animals go off to people who are really going to care for and appreciate them; I love meeting fellow smallholders as well, so it's really a win-win! 

GRAND OPENING OF THE CHICKEN SHED- SEPTEMBER 2018

The build of our 'Class Q' conversion of a former commercial chicken shed to a domestic home is finally complete and who better to cut the ribbon than Jon's visiting family friends, Mike and Marsha? It was lovely to be able to show everyone the outcome of 21 weeks of solid work by Jon and his team. 

out and about with arya- august 2018

Dales pony

Arya, our yearling Dales pony, has been away at 'pony summer camp' with experienced horsewoman and native pony producer, Cath Anderson, for a bit of education and socialisation this summer. Cath has been taking her out and about and she's been behaving beautifully. She's a bit of a clumsy girl (I can relate to that!) and is still looking rather 'gawky', being a yearling, but having positive experiences of the world this early on can only be a good thing for her all round education. It isn't about winning shows as such; it's about turning her into a well balanced young horse who is level headed enough to take part in a range of activities. With there being so few Dales ponies left (they're on the 'critical' list of the RBST),  it's important for the breed to be out there showing what they can do. We are hoping she will be a true 'all-rounder'  and are even thinking about breaking her to drive, something that we can enjoy together. Ernie is missing her while she is away but he's getting lots of individual attention. Plus, there's no one to compete with for hay!

TO THE SHOW WE DID GO!- AUGUST 2018

image125

As we are one of the only Mangalitsa breeders in the South West we were asked to take along an example of the breed to the inaugural 'pig tent' at North Devon Show. The co-ordinator of the tent wanted an example of each of the 12 recognised breed and of course it's a nightmare trying to get a Manga as they're so rare. So we decided that Billy, a castrated boy from Tilly's first litter, would be the show 'exhibit'. He was duly subjected to a wash and brush up, which he was suitably scornful about.

image126

The woolly 'sheep-pig' caused quite the stir in North Devon. Very few people had seen a Mangalitsa before and were very curious. Billy put up with being stroked by hundreds of people, which bearing in mind he had never even been off the farm before, was pretty good of him. We sat with him and fielded endless questions. One lady even wanted to spin garmants from his wool. I don't think they would have been terribly comfortable to wear!

image127

It was a tiring but rewarding day for all of us. To be fair, Billy spent much of it asleep! We met several people wanting to get involved in the breed and buy meat weaners. Of course we were clear (as we always are) that we don't sell breeding stock, though we hope to move into registered purebred Mangas in the not too distant future.

A busy Summer- august 2018

image128

School only broke up a week ago, but the pace of life is only ramping up on the farm! We are in the final five weeks of the build on 'The Chicken Shed' - a large building on the farm that used to house a commercial chicken flock. We gained planning permission under what's known as 'Class Q', which allows for the conversion of redundant agricultural buildings. This is the 'before picture'-  the 'after picture' is to come, but suffice to say that under Jon's expert project management, it's gone from a sad old shack that was literally no use to man nor beast, to looking deliciously swish! 

image129

On the basis that even in the holidays  'every day's a school day' I have been trying my hand at baking bread. My first effort (pictured) looked a little wonky but tasted delicious enough to convert me over to putting the effort in to making this staple on a regular basis. I am off to Clyston Mill, a National Trust historic flour mill just down the road in Broadclyst later this week, to source some truly local flour.

image130

Herdwick sheep are famous for the quality of their mutton and we are truly enjoying ours, especially the burgers made for us by Coles of Ottery. They are a little fattier than conventional lamb burgers, but this really does add to the flavour, which is deeper, richer and more like beef than lamb. Whilst the 'Herdies' didn't fit into our flock of petite Welsh Badger Faced sheep very well (they were on/off lame for ages, despite ours and our vets' extensive investigations) they seem worth keeping for the mutton alone. 

Feeling hot - 1st July 2018

image131

There's been a heatwave in the UK this past week, with temperatures reaching a heady 30 degrees. Unfortunately this coincided with Tilly's due date. When she didn't emerge for breakfast one morning we knew it was time and moved her to the new farrowing pen, where she went without complaint.She seemed a bit quiet, but we attributed this to the heat and set her up an oscillating fan to keep her cool. Late Wednesday night she had nine piglets with relative ease. All seemed well. 

image132

As the heat grew even more intense we noticed that Tilly wasn't up and about.  I gave her water through a hose, which she sucked greedily on like a straw. Things weren't right;  we began supplementing the babies with milk replacement. The 'runt'  ('Spike' ) was bottle fed so we could ensure he got his share.

image133

Over the phone the vet advised dousing Tilly with water to keep her cool and monitoring her. Sadly one piglet died overnight and another (the only remaining gilt) was in a bad way. Our lovely vet Fi arrived on Saturday morning, gave Tilly antibiotics and painkiller (she had, it seemed , mastitis, possibly caused by heat stress) and took the little gilt into the surgery to administer IV fluids. Sadly, she too later died. However, our darling Tilly is slowly recovering, up on her feet and drinking. This morning she even ate a few pig nuts. I've been feeding the seven remaining piglets every 2-3 hours, which has been exhausting. And it's now raining and much cooler, so hopefully this little family are on the road to recovery and mum will soon be taking back the reins. Cheeky little Spike seems to still like feeling special and coming out for his bottle; he's a serious cutie so I'm indulging him for now!

Pigmageddon- 2nd June 2018

Today has been a day of playing 'piggy jenga.' Reliable old Mangalitsa sow Tilly is most certainly in pig so it was time for Marmalade to be introduced to his new wife, Red. 

This entailed everyone moving pens, as Red has a liking for jumping on top of fencing so needed to be in the most secure pen with her new amour. 

The Tamworth crosses and their mate Billy (who we kept from Tilly's last litter) seemed to like their new neighbour and pen. I think Billy recognised his mum, but who knows. 

First calving season- survived! 1st May 2018

image134

As I am writing, all the cattle are finally out in the fields enjoying the fresh grass on this breezy May day. At times it felt like they'd be imprisoned in the sheds forever, not least on the memorable day when the first two calves arrived. Kenny (named after recently deceased comedian Ken Dodd) arrived early one morning when the rain was hammering down so hard that it sounded like nails been thrown onto the roof. We breathed sighs of joyous relief at his safe arrival;  his mum is Amber, the  cow with most 'personality' (for that, read 'awkward')  and we popped down the road for a congratulatory Indian. On arrival back at the farm after an excellent Masala,  we were shocked to find a second bull calf, out of Audrey, who definitely wasn't meant to calve for another few days! He was a strong little fella, who we named Kev, after our decorator. Third past the post was yet another nice bull calf, this time out of Petal,  one of the second time calvers. He was named (rather grandly) Kingdom, after the museum dedicated to Isambard Kingsom Brunel, which was opened in the week of his birth. 


 By this time we were rather hoping for a heifer calf to join the herd and were rewarded with a pretty, delicate little girl - Karma. 


Last to calve was our secret favourite - herd leader and matriarch Ange, who was overdue and looked thoroughly fed up. When she started calving at 10pm on Friday night we thought that things would move along quite quickly. Jon valiantly stayed up with her until 4.30am on Saturday, but there were still no signs of the calf. I got up as dawn broke, took one look at her and called the vet. Our wonderful vet Fi arrived, equipped with a calving jack, but this baby was just too enormous and after much effort all round, a C section was decided to be the only way of saving her. We were warned that it was unlikely that the calf would be alive after such a long battle, so steeled ourselves for the worst and saddest outcome. It felt like a miracle when a HUGE bull calf was pulled out and took his first breath. He was the same size as calves nearly a fortnight older than him and he had only just come out. There was no other possible name for this chap, and it was bestowed upon him there and then. 


Kilo. 

Farrantshayes in 'The Landsman' again! 17th April 2018

image135

This time I'm blathering on about balancing smallholding with the teaching 'day job' and missing the birth of our first livestock.

All the news! 18th march 2018

image136

Due to some technical difficulties, it's been a while since our last update but plenty has been going on down on the farm! The Mangalitsa piglets all went off to fabulous new homes, some as pets and some to be brought on for charcuterie. Their collection dates were rather affected by the snow though! We also collected our pigs for Pigshare 2018- five Tamworth cross Oxford Sandy and Blacks. We have found a very local breeder (just outside Cullompton) and the opportunity to get the 'food miles' on our pigs down even further was just too good to pass up. We kept one Mangalitsa boar back from Matilda's litter- a little brown lad called Billy- and he is in an indoor pen, as it's just too cold and muddy for little pigs outside at the moment-  getting to know his new ginger friends. We have also invested in two more Mangalitsa sows- Maggie and Red- purchased from a breeder who was downsizing. We really do love the breed-they're so hardy, unusual and personable! They're due to have litters in a month or so, so some of the people who didn't get a chance to buy from Matilda's litter may yet get an opportunity to own one of these wonderful pigs this Summer. 


It's been a very exciting time on the cattle front. We brought the five Devon girls who were due to calve into the warm inner barn, with cosy individual pens made up for when the calves were born. We certainly weren't expecting two to calve on one day, but that's exactly what happened. Amber had a smart little bull calf who we named Kenny (after recently deceased comedian Ken Dodd) in the early hours of the morning of Wednesday 14th March and Audrey had another bull calf,who we've called Kevin at about 9pm that evening. Both delivered unassisted - rare for first time calvers. There was only one hairy moment when another, more experienced expectant mum tried to 'steal' Kenny from Amber, who (at that point) was still not that bothered about him. All's well that ends well though- after being taken off hurriedly into a private pen away from the interfering 'nanny' they've bonded beautifully. All we need now are some nice heifer calves from the remaining three girls who can go on and join the herd. 


As I type we are in the midst of round two of 'The Beast from the East- snowy weather that is unheard of down in Devon. It does make the farm look beautiful, but all the water troughs freeze. Getting water to all the animals using just a bucket and a wheelbarrow is not much fun, especially in sub zero temperatures and (like farmers around the country) we simply can't rest without knowing everyone is fed and watered. 

Bringing home the bacon-30th january 2018

image137

This morning we headed off to the butchers to collect the cured bacon and gammon from the four pigs who went off in December.It looks absolutely delicious. We used the last of our bacon from the first pigs a few days ago and were dreading the thought of buying supermarket bacon again. So much water comes out of it in comparison to our homegrown stuff. There is a bit more fat but I tend to just trim it off and feed it to the birds, who really appreciate it in this cold weather. Failing that, it crisps up beautifully in the pan and is a real treat!

image138

It was Jon's second trip to our abbatoir/butcher this week as on Monday he dropped off two of the store lambs we bought last Summer. Before they went we had to trim their bellies (they need to be clean and mud free) and I took photos of their eartag numbers for the paperwork that I need to fill out to be sent to ARAMS- the sheep and goat movement authority. Every time a sheep or goat moves location a form needs to be filled in and sent off- arduous but entirely required. These two will be coming back to us in a couple of week's time as vac packed lamb. A couple who took part in last year's pigshare is having a half and it's very rewarding to have our first returning customer- we must be doing something right!

image139

I have also been working on designing the labels for our meat. I wanted to  incorporate the farm logo and have labels that are suitable for freezing, as the current ones tend to fade.Vale Labels in Wellington have been most helpful and have created a label that will fit into the printing machine at our butcher, so hopefully when the lamb comes back it will be sporting our branding- very swish!

first babies on the farm- 21st january 2018

image140

One of the tough things about combining a day job with smallholding is when exciting things happen, you are invariably in a meeting. So on the 8th January it fell to Jon to act as 'pig-wife'- as Tilly the Mangalitsa delivered no less than 13 piglets! As the average litter for this breed is 5.6 piglets, this was something of a shock and as novice pig breeders we were thrown into the thick of trying desperately to keep them all alive. Nine survived- seven girls ('gilts') and two boys ('boars').

image141

They are the first livestock bred by us to be born on the farm, so we are rather proud of them. They are a dazzling variety of colours and it's very easy to 'lose' half an hour just sitting and watching them play! Mum is doing well but is very protective, so we keep a respectful distance. One of the boys is the colour of a baby fawn and full of personality; Jon is rather taken with him so I suspect he will be staying! The rest are for sale- do contact me if you are interested!

FARRANTSHAYES IN 'THE LANDSMAN' FOR 2018!-6TH JANUARY 2018

image142

The lovely Becky from 'The Landsman' magazine approached me a few months back and asked if I would be willing to write a 'warts and all' account of our smallholding experiences in 2018. How could I POSSIBLY pass up the opportunity to tell a readership of 50,000 people about our daftest and most embarrassing mistakes? Not satisfied with this I thought I would add in a picture of me attempting to drive a tractor whilst looking like I should be shovelling tarmac or holding a STOP/GO sign. 

Pick your free copy from over 200 outlets around the South West. You don't get much for free in this world but this is one thing that is!